Art (Merlin)

Jul. 24th, 2017 10:39 pm
goss: (Paint Brushes)
[personal profile] goss
Title: Excalibur
Artist: [personal profile] goss
Rating: G
Fandom: Merlin (BBC)
Characters/Pairings: Arthur Pendragon (with Excalibur)
Content Notes: Pencil sketch created for the [community profile] drawesome Weekly Challenge #4: One Object, Two Perspectives.

My choice of object was inspired by this gif set on Tumblr. I had to make up certain parts of the sword for both perspective drawings, and found this YouTube vid really helpful as a starting point: How to draw a sword in perspective.

Preview:


Click here for entire artwork )
goss: (Supergirl - watercolour)
[personal profile] goss
  1. Finished my two-week employment marking papers for a National Exam for Visual Arts. It was a good experience to gain as an Educator in the field, but not one I'll be repeating any time soon. Way too tedious having to mark the same couple questions over and over for what felt like THOUSANDS of students. Plus it took up the entire first two weeks of summer vacation. So glad I am done! \o/ And now my vacation can truly begin! \o/

  2. I've been avidly following the SDCC tag on Tumblr since Thursday, and it's amazing seeing so many fandoms converging in one spot. The superstars are all there, the new trailers are out, the fans are delighted like kids at Christmas, and there seems to be so much *JOY* everywhere. It's been such a treat, waking up the past couple days wondering what new delights await. :D

  3. I also noted (via Tumblr) that in the midst of all the glee, the Supergirl fandom is going through an Actors-related Thing. Which, my sympathies, Supergirl slash fans. More than anything, I know that it's the disrespect and disregard for what you hold dear that hurts. The complicated relationship between Kara and Lena, and their chemistry, was one of the few things to pique my interest in the show. Apparently I have a type. :b As a longtime Super-Luthor shipper from the olden days of Smallville, I feel your pain of loving your ship even when knowing it's never ever gonna be validated or respected by TPTB. It brings back so many memories... *___* Hey, at least they're honest and don't falsely pander and queerbait like some. *side-eyes a certain wolfy show*

  4. Anyway, speaking of Lena Luthor, and Katie McGrath (who I adore ♥)... I'm thinking of doing some BBC Merlin fanart for this week's drawing challenge at [community profile] drawesome. We're supposed to draw an object from two different perspectives, and I'm thinking some kind of important artefact, like King Arthur's Excalibur.

    There are a *LOT* of Significant Objects in fandom to choose from. Stuff like weapons - Thor's hammer Mjolnir, Cap's Shield, Harry Potter's wand, Wonder Woman's lasso, the Doctor's sonic screwdriver, Wynonna Earp's colt. And then there's vehicles, like Stile's jeep and Dean's Impala, and every sci-fi spaceship ever... *g*

state of the pups

Jul. 22nd, 2017 11:27 pm
wildefae: (Default)
[personal profile] wildefae
Crossposting a new state of the pups for TCRPG over here.

(If nothing else, come see the new Lyall gif!)
dorothy1901: Gilda: Put the blame on Mame (Default)
[personal profile] dorothy1901
The USS Constitution, the oldest commissioned warship in the world (first launched in 1797), has been restored. There's a pretty interesting article on the restoration in today's Boston Globe, with photographs and diagrams. (So that's where the orlop deck is!)

Link: A look inside the USS Constitution’s restoration. (Note: the Boston Globe has a paywall, but I believe that non-subscribers can read up to five articles for free.)

(no subject)

Jul. 21st, 2017 08:13 am
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
More things I have learnt from physio - mainly notes to self. I suspect [personal profile] hagar_972 and [personal profile] taennyn may have useful experience here, where I'm just starting out on the same journey they've already been on.

Muscles in the thigh - VMO, lateralis, the big quad one, the sartorius one across, adductors on the inside, abductors on the outside. VMO needs extra strengthening due to hypermobility. The small stabilising muscles tend to give up, then the big muscles compensate, and that's why my hamstrings get tight all the time. Then the hip/bum ones like glute max and glute mede also need help, particularly the latter.

Making sure things activate in the right order is hard. If the lateralis activates before the VMO instead of at the same time, then my kneecap slides sideways and that's one of the reasons it hurts. Trying to activate the VMO first will retrain it so they both go at the same time.

Reading Wednesday

Jul. 19th, 2017 10:30 pm
muccamukk: Bill standing in front of the TARDIS bookshelf. (DW: Queen of Books)
[personal profile] muccamukk
What I Just Finished Reading

Still No Word by Shannon Webb-Campbell
I read this slowly and several times. I have trouble writing about poetry, but I liked the clarity and feeling here.

Chalk by Paul Cornell
Hard to know what to rate this one. I think it does what it's trying to do with great effectiveness, but I'm not really interested in what it's trying to do? The story does claustrophobic, creepy and bleak, pretty well wall to wall, which I think is very true to the author's experiences, but like with Gaiman's Ocean at the End of the Lane (with which this shared a lot of elements), I'm not that invested.

I liked a lot of the struggle for significance in the face of meaningless cruelty, and the storytelling itself was delightfully creepy (for those into horror), but it was a hard read.


The Firebrand and the First Lady: Portrait of a Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the Struggle for Social Justice by Patricia Bell Scott
I knew very little about Mrs Roosevelt and nothing about Pauli Murray going in, and loved finding out about them. The book primarily focuses on Murray and her life, with the interactions with ER highlighted and context of ER's life at those times added. It doesn't shy away from their weaknesses and mistakes, which is nice in a positive bio. I felt that it gave me a strong understanding of both women, and of how their interactions with politics changed over the years. I now want to read bios of all the other amazing women they crossed paths with along the way.

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith, narrated by Kate Burton
I really enjoyed this. It's sort of meandering and reflective, with time jumps and backstory, but I just liked spending time living with these characters. There was a core of good intentions and kindness in most of them, even if most of them didn't always live up to that. The period setting was phenomenal.

The Quartermaster: Montgomery C. Meigs, Lincoln's General, Master Builder of the Union Army by Robert O'Harrow, narrated by Tom Perkins
Perhaps a little heavy on lauding our hero, rather than letting his achievements stand on their own, but absolutely fascinating for all that. I would have liked more on the mundane logistics of the Civil War supply system, and maybe a bit less building things before the war, though the War Department politics were very interesting.

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead, narrated by Bahni Turpin
I can't figure out if this book is not as clever as it thinks it is, or if I'm just not smart enough to get it. A problem I have with a lot of litfic, to be honest.

I was initially cooler on it, but reading some interviews with the author gave me a better idea of what he was doing, and that helped my appreciation of the book.

I admit that I did not find the surface narrative of Cora's escape that interesting, though I liked Cora herself, and it was kind of neat to pick out threads from various real slave narratives. The alternate history elements in the Carolinas were also pretty neat, though they didn't really tie into the railway being an actual railway, which frankly I don't get the point of.

There were themes of story telling and who gets to have a voice/tell the story of enslaved people, which I didn't really pick up on myself, but appreciated after hearing the author talk about it.

All in all I liked it, but don't really get the buzz.


Adrift on the Sea of Rains (The Apollo Quartet, #1) by Ian Sales, narrated by Jeffrey Schmidt
Competent alternate history, which is mostly enjoyable because of the massive amount of NASA nerdery. Though props to the author for starting the series with such an unlikable protagonist (the kind of man who thinks he's the best ever, but is clearly not someone who should be in charge of a gas station, let alone a moon base). The tech conceit was a bit handwavey, but it got the story where it was going, and I enjoyed how it unfolded.

The Eye With Which The Universe Beholds Itself (The Apollo Quartet, #2) by Ian Sales, narrated by Jeffrey Schmidt
Again with pleasing NASA nerdery (though stop explaining abbreviations! anyone this far down the NASA rabbit hole knows what LEO stands for, let alone USAF! I liked the conflict between civilian NASA and the Air Force space corps.

However, the hero is more or less why I don't read SF by dudes unless it's recced. His entire character is basically Sad Because His Wife Left Him. There are no significant women in the story other than the ex-wife.

I also didn't believe the central plot point, which I won't spoil, but will say was a handwave too far in terms of science. You can't just wave the word "Quantum" around and expect me to believe it. I might not have minded as much if I'd liked the hero, but here we are.

Then Will The Great Ocean Wash Deep Above (The Apollo Quartet, #3) by Ian Sales (Goodreads Author), narrated by Trina Nishimura
I mean, It's always nice to read an AU where the Mercury 13 got to go to space, even if they continued to get screwed over by NASA, but I didn't find the plot of this one very compelling. Sales clearly couldn't think of much to do with female astronauts other than have them do the same stuff all the guys had done and then cheat them out of the moon walk, so half the plot is about a male deep-sea diver who is looking for a spy satellite's cargo. I basically felt like I was reading a non-fiction book about the US spy program, with a Korean War AU on the side. Thin on both characterisation and plot. Author describes make and model of every plane, train and automobile in story. Does not need to do this.


Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World by Margaret MacMillan, narrated by Suzanne Toren
I know everyone read this when it came out ages ago, but I admit to having read the preface and then skipped to the bits about T.E. Lawrence, at the time, so this is my first go through.

I really appreciate the historical perspective, and how the author kept focused on the conference, but provided the background for each of the major regions and disputes. The personalities of all the diplomats were very well drawn, and I liked the heavy use of quotes and original sources. They helped keep me engaged in the storyline.

The conclusion regarding the spin out from the peace conference was very interesting, and I'll have to check out more books on the topic.


What I'm Reading Now
Theoretically a couple things, practically not much.

What I'm Reading Next

No idea.
Going on a trip starting tomorrow, so probably a lot of romance novels. *remembers to charge e-reader*

What I'm Doing Wednesday

Jul. 19th, 2017 09:36 pm
sage: close up of a slice of lemon held up against the sky, dripping (lemon)
[personal profile] sage
books (Christie, Arendt) )

allergy mystery food challenge weirdness )

pockets a happy shopping adventure )

yarning
Friday is the 6 month anniversary of the Women's March, so now I have another calendar deadline for showing at least one version of my current project. (I'm struggling to convince myself that I AM ALLOWED to revise later.) I've spent all day today working on it, and all evening redesigning a crucial piece. There's so much yet to do, but I'm learning so much.

Annnd I just realized I didn't post this earlier. Oops?

Art (Wonder Woman)

Jul. 19th, 2017 09:18 pm
goss: (Rainbow - Pencils)
[personal profile] goss
Title: Bulletproof
Artist: [personal profile] goss
Rating: G
Fandom: DCU, Wonder Woman (2017)
Characters/Pairings: Diana
Content Notes: This is a quick one, sketched with pencil. Don't have the time to do a proper watercolour painting job as yet. So in the mean time, I've added some digital tinting in Photoshop, as well as played around with the lighting. I actually like the results. ^___^

Created for the [community profile] drawesome Weekly Challenge #3: Song Lyric Prompt. Inspired by Titanium by David Guetta featuring Sia (Ricochet, you take your aim, fire away...).

Preview:


Click here for entire artwork )

(no subject)

Jul. 19th, 2017 09:16 am
harpers_child: melaka fray reading from "Tales of the Slayers". (Default)
[personal profile] harpers_child
1. Dad had spine surgery on Monday. He's got rods from L4 to S1 now. He's doing well.

2. Sunday I indulged the stereotype and polished silver. Did mom's everyday teaspoons and the serving pieces out the china cabinet. Might do the place settings this afternoon.

3. Considering doing another round of PT. Not sure if I can be sent for the all of me. If I had to choose something it'd be my shoulders and wrists.

Profile

mary: A picture of a woman sitting in front of a stained glass window, from Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds (Default)
Isn't moral anarchy kind of the point?

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